How Contract Employees Can Help Your IT Team

December 11th, 2015

The start of the year can be an uncertain time in business. Project commitments and budgets for the new year may not be final yet, while work may have missed end-of-year deadlines and carried forward to the new year. Departments that are struggling to cope with the challenge of high volumes of work in the first quarter may find temporary help to be an ideal solution.

Catch Up on Deadlines

If you missed deadlines at the end of the year, adding temporary staff can help you get back on top of your projects. Contract employees can bring specialized skills your team was missing, enabling you to solve problems the team was struggling with. Alternatively, bringing in contractors with basic skill sets can free your team from grunt work and let them focus on the value-added functions that require the business knowledge only long-term employees have. In either scenario, using contractors means there’s no long-term commitment on your part, so once the project’s back on track, they can be let go without any hard feelings on either side.

Get a Jump on New Projects

If you have projects line up for the new year that need to be staffed and can’t afford to wait to bring on new permanent hires, using contractors lets you build an IT team quickly so the project can start without delay. You can continue to search for appropriate permanent employees without the pressure of hiring somebody, anybody, just to get work started. You can also avoid the risk of adding permanent staff until you have management’s final commitment to the project and know it won’t be canceled just as you bring on new developers.

Keep Budgets and Headcount Under Control

Not every company has budgets and headcount for the new year finalized at the beginning of January. If you aren’t certain how many resources you’ll be able to support in the coming year, using contractors gives you flexibility to adapt when changes occur. If you do have final headcount and budget numbers, and they’re lower than you requested, using contract employees can be more cost-effective, as you don’t have to factor in the cost of benefits.
Whether you want to hire permanent staff or use contract employees on a temporary basis, working with a staffing agency is the most efficient way to find the right people for your team. Contact InReach IT Solutions to find out how we can help you solve your staffing problems.

3 Ways to Know You’re Micromanaging

November 20th, 2015

Part of your job as a manager is to oversee your team’s work, but it’s also part of your job to let your team get the work done themselves. Micromanaging is damaging to team morale; it’s also damaging to your career because the time you spend overseeing your team is time you can’t spend focused on bigger priorities. Here are three signs that you’re micromanaging instead of leading:

  1. You check in with your team daily, or even more often. You even check in when you’re on vacation. If you need constant status reports and updates to reassure you that things are going ok, your team legitimately feels that you don’t trust them to get the work done. If you have good people on your team, trust that they’ll get the work done. Let them know they can, and should, come to you when there are problems. While you need to get updates and stay informed, “no news is good news” is as true at the office as it is anywhere else. Learn to limit your requests for status updates to once a week except when you’re truly in crisis mode.
  1. You sweat the small stuff. As a manager, you should be focused on the overall goals and progress of a project, not the details of every work item. Let your team accomplish their tasks on their own. You may be more experienced than they are, and can share your knowledge, but ultimately they need to find their own way to get the job done. As long as the results are satisfactory and the way the work is getting done isn’t causing any friction or other problems, the process isn’t really a problem.
  1. You keep the important tasks for yourself. Failing to delegate is a common sign of micromanagement. Keeping the “important” tasks for yourself assures you that they’ll be done the way you want, but it also means your team is stuck with just the drudgework. It also deprives team members of the chance to learn and develop their skills—skills that would help them work more independently in the future.

Need help building a team you can trust so you can stop micromanaging? Work with InReach IT Solutions to find job candidates with the skills to work independently.